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The Library Channel

Nov 22, 2017 ·

 

Your paper is due at midnight. Your roommate just got dumped and needs to talk it out. And the status of your group project is a mystery to all.

Don’t worry. You’ve got this.  

 

 

 

Here are 7 reasons why:

  1. ASU librarians. Helping you succeed is not just a thing they’re good at – it’s in their job description. Let them help you. They want to help you. It’s why they’re here.
  1. Online help.  Your questions about citations, keywords and research databases already have answers, and you can find them on our FAQs page, where librarians are also available for online chat. Relax – if you have a connection to the internet, there is hope.
  1. Group study rooms. Maybe it’s time to figure out what’s going on with your group project. Several types of group study spaces are available at our libraries to support those necessary conversations and collaborations. Gather your group and get it done.
  1. Quiet and silent study. No signs of your roommate quieting down any time soon. Have no fear – ASU Library quiet and silent study is a thing, and it’s here for you. It’s a magical place where devices go silent and your thoughts thank you.
  1. Counseling. Not a library service, but a great resource nonetheless, offered to ASU students who may be feeling like they need to talk to someone. You’re not alone. Also, you may want to suggest it to your roommate.
  1. Stress relief stations. Starting Nov. 29, ASU Library will be offering free food and stress reduction in the form of puzzles, coloring books, stress balls and onsite librarian help. It’s a stress-free zone, we promise.  
  1. Reflection Room. Hayden Library is home to the Reflection Room, a small, quiet space where one can leave the frenzy of college life behind and unplug, meditate, pray or simply just be. Sometimes you just need a moment to reboot.

Relax, take a breath.

You’ve got this.

Nov 22, 2017 ·

Between writing papers, studying for exams and putting the final touches on a big project, ASU students might be needing a little extra support during these last two weeks of the fall semester.

Here to help, ASU Library is offering Finals Stress Relief on Wednesday, Nov. 29 all the way through Tuesday, Dec. 5.

Located in several library locations, including Hayden Library, Noble Library and Fletcher Library, stress relief stations will offer a variety of stress-reducing aids in the form of free food and drink, coloring books, stress balls, puzzles and an onsite librarian to help answer any questions.

Project Manager Patty Odle says final exams can be a particularly challenging time for ASU students, which is why, this year, she is leading stress relief activities over several consecutive days. 

“We want students to know that we are here to help them succeed, and this is just one small way to help them achieve their goals,” Odle says.

For students looking to decompress, find a moment of peace or just get some extra support, check out these ASU Library resources

Oct 31, 2017 ·

ASU Library has entered a lively phase of its reinvention, with many books, collections and materials in transit as Hayden Library prepares to undergo a major renovation, slated for 2018-2020.

While all libraries will be impacted, students, faculty and staff can expect to see the most disruptions at Hayden Library and Noble Library on the Tempe campus.

Science books identified as low-use are leaving Noble Library, while other highly used science books will remain at Noble in their new location on the second floor in the eastern-most section of compact shelving.

All science books that are leaving Noble Library, to make space for new materials coming from Hayden, will be accessible from ASU Library's high density collection (HDC). A significant portion of these materials will be available immediately for request.

Items that may appear as "unavailable" via our online library One Search can still be requested through our Interlibrary Loan service.

For help locating or requesting materials:

  • Ask A Librarian can help get you the materials you need. 
     
  • Library staff at the reference desk can give you information about your requested items. 
     
  • ASU librarians are happy to work with you to find the resources you need. 

Plans to redesign Hayden Library include adding multiple points of access, with greater indoor-outdoor connection; dedicating space for community gatherings; breaking the library up thematically to better facilitate navigation and research discovery; featuring and enhancing special collections; and building a smaller, highly curated academic print collection that draws from the library's 4.5 million volumes.

Oct 20, 2017 ·

Beginning this month, ASU Library will be entering a lively phase of its reinvention, with many books, collections and materials in transit as Hayden Library prepares to undergo a major renovation, slated for 2018-2020.

While all libraries will be impacted, students, faculty and staff can expect to see the most disruptions at Hayden Library and Noble Library on the Tempe campus. 

A significant portion of books and other materials moving out of Hayden Library will be available immediately at Noble Library.

Items that may appear as "unavailable" via our online library One Search can still be requested through our Interlibrary Loan service.

For help locating or requesting materials:

  • Ask A Librarian can help get you the materials you need. 
     
  • Library staff at the reference desk can give you information about your requested items. 
     
  • ASU librarians are happy to work with you to find the resources you need. 

Plans to redesign Hayden Library include adding multiple points of access, with greater indoor-outdoor connection; dedicating space for community gatherings; breaking the library up thematically to better facilitate navigation and research discovery; featuring and enhancing special collections; and building a smaller, highly curated academic print collection that draws from the library's 4.5 million volumes.

Oct 19, 2017 ·

"What books? Where?"

The future of the printed book is the subject of a newly released white paper by ASU Library. 

As part of a $50,000 planning grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation exploring the future of print, the analysis is aimed at fostering engagement with print resources among library users, particularly with open stack print collections and users within the local community. 

"We advocate moving toward a more flexible, more user-focused service that makes library collections easier to understand and to use," write the authors. 

The Future of the Academic Library Print Collection: A Space for Engagement explores a three-tiered system of potential approaches and actions for academic libraries to foster engagement with their collections, and includes materials and tools to help guide individual libraries towards a data-driven approach to print curation that may be tailored to their local context.

"Our print collections have a long and glorious future ahead," write the authors. "We must work to create and curate open collections that make it easier for rising student generations, to become skilled and resourceful users of print."

To learn more about ASU Library's Future of Print initiative, visit lib.asu.edu/futureprint.

Oct 11, 2017 ·

Arizona State University has been awarded a $450,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for a three-year project designed to build and expand community-driven collections, in an effort to preserve and improve Arizona’s archives and give voice to historically marginalized communities.

Under the leadership of ASU Library Archivist Nancy Godoy and co-investigators, Dr. Sujey Vega and Lorrie McAllister, the project – titled “Engaging, Educating, and Empowering: Developing Community-Driven Archival Collections” – will implement Archives and Preservation Workshops and Digitization and Oral History Days as well as digitize and make publicly accessible existing archival collections from ASU Library’s Chicano/a Research Collection and Greater Arizona Collection.

“This generous grant from the Mellon Foundation will help ASU and ASU Library continue to build an atmosphere that educates and empowers individuals by promoting equal ownership of archives and shared stewardship responsibilities,” said Godoy, principal investigator. “Multiple perspectives and narratives are needed in order to get an accurate understanding of Arizona history. Marginalized communities have the right to preserve their own archives and should feel invested in ongoing efforts to preserve a more complete representation of local history.”

In 2012, the Arizona Archives Matrix Project, a statewide initiative to gather data about local archives, identified several historically marginalized communities in Arizona, including LGBT, Asian American, African American and the Latino community, which makes up 30 percent of Arizona’s population but is represented in less than 2 percent of known archival collections.

With the aim to address this inequity, the ASU project will build on Godoy’s previous work co-establishing the Arizona LGBT History Project and collaborating with ASU faculty members Dr. Vega and Dr. Vanessa Fonseca on an ASU School of Transborder Studies seed grant titled “Preserving Arizona’s Latina/o Presence: Community Based Workshops on Archival Preservation and K-12 Curriculum,” which implemented archives and preservation workshops statewide and helped to assess community needs and interests.

“Nancy Godoy’s work demonstrates the inclusive and socially embedded values of ASU, and is helping marginalized communities to recognize the value of their personal material,” said McAllister, Associate University Librarian for Collections and Strategy at ASU Library.

"This grant will enable the acquisition and growth of community-driven collections as well as introduce notions of intersectionality, as the library works to integrate these lived realities into our ‘collective memory’ – our shared history – of Arizona,” said Vega, Assistant Professor, School of Social Transformation.

Oct 09, 2017 ·

 

Searching for materials at ASU Library is now a single-platform process, including requesting materials from outside the library, known as Interlibrary Loan – a supplemental service that should be used when the material needs of students, faculty and staff cannot be met with ASU Library resources.

Requests for materials that are not available through ASU Library are processed via the new One Search. Fueled by the Alma/Primo platform, ASU Library's new and improved search engine will automatically display an option to request materials from an external library when those materials are not owned by or available at ASU Library. 

Users will then receive a notice that the item is ready for pickup once the item arrives at the specified circulation desk. 

When requesting electronic delivery of documents (book chapters and articles), users will receive an email when their Document Delivery request has been filled.

Document Delivery requests that cannot be filled by ASU Library will be automatically sent to the user's ILLiad account for processing. The user will then receive notification from ILLiad and will access the PDF document from their ILLiad account once the file becomes available.

Oct 04, 2017 ·

Historical treasures belonging to two Mexican-American families in the Phoenix area – the Hinojosa family and the Franco French family – are now part of ASU Library’s Chicano/a Research Collection.

“Everything [in their collections] is of historic importance because everything relates to the building of what we now call the Mexican community of Phoenix,” said Christine Marin, a former ASU archivist, who helped facilitate the archival donations.

ASU Library Archivist Nancy Godoy spent more than a year processing, preserving and making the donated items publicly available.

“Family collections, for me, personally, are very important because they tell so many different stories,” Godoy said. “So that’s priority for us, to make these collections accessible to the community.”

Read the full ASU Now story: A tale of two families

Sep 25, 2017 ·

When students at Arizona State University enter the library this week, they will be greeted by an unusual sign: “Don’t read these books.”

The sign, directing students to a display of books that have been banned or challenged throughout history, is intended to mentally jolt — cue the record scratch — even the most distracted Sun Devils.

This is the tongue-in-cheek tradition of Banned Books Week, an annual, cautious celebration of books and our right to read them.

“Banned Books Week is probably one of the most important events in the literary profession,” said Ashley Gohr, a First Year Experience librarian with ASU Library. “It’s a week when librarians, publishers, teachers and writers help to educate our communities by inviting deeper conversations about censorship and the power of words and storytelling, especially for marginalized communities.”

ASU Library is looking to open up the event this year to an even larger audience through social media, book displays and other activities that encourage thinking around free speech and about books as a powerful technology.

Gohr says that although the practice of banning books is very serious and concerning, the ASU Library events this week will offer “small acts of creative defiance” that are not only educational but fun too.

Language, sex and race

Books get banned, restricted or challenged for a variety of reasons, Gohr said, but offensive language, sexual content and racism are among the most common.

Just last year, more than 300 challenges to books were recorded by the American Library Association (ALA), a figure which does not include all the censorship attempts made to films, exhibits, newspapers, magazines, broadcasts, plays and performances.

Famously banned books include “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain (language, racism), “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” by Sherman Alexie (language, violence, sexual content), and “Their Eyes Were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston (sexual content).

Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” was once described as “filthy” by some mid-nineteenth century booksellers.

The impulse to censor, Gohr says, is a direct response to the inherent power ideas hold and the strength of books to spread them.

“Books are thought of as dangerous, and they are! They contain ideas and stories that can change minds and lives,” she says.

#WordsHavePower

#WordsHavePower is the tagline for this year’s Banned Books Week, an ALA-sponsored event that ASU Library plans to highlight with increasing force each year.

Plans to grow the annual event include a speaker series, a reading flash mob and public readings of censored work on all of ASU’s campuses.

This year, Gohr and fellow ASU Library staffer Ashley Barckett have been busy pulling books from library shelves — “as many as we can fit,” they say — to include in the Hayden Library banned book display.

The ragtag collection includes such classics as “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “Beloved” and sits alongside a reading nook where the ASU community is encouraged to linger, interact and explore the books “in question.” Banned book displays will be featured at several other campus libraries as well.

Additionally, Gohr and Barckett have put together a banned book scavenger hunt and set up a button-making station in the Hayden Library mkrspace, for those #RebelReaders who want to wear their Toni Morrisons and Ralph Ellisons on their sleeve.

There will also be a poetry slam in Hayden Library (room C41) on Thursday at 7 p.m., hosted by Amnesty International. 

“This is a great opportunity to celebrate the library as a place of access, discovery and inclusion — particularly at an institution like ASU,” said Barckett, a library information specialist. “Many of our international students come from countries that have different views on censorship, and books are still challenged and banned regularly in the U.S. This event is as relevant as ever.”

Barckett and Gohr say they will be wearing buttons and T-shirts throughout the week that signify banned authors and books, such as “The Autobiography of Malcolm X” and the book-burning “Fahrenheit 451,” which, Gohr says, might be the most ironic banned book of all.

"It's about banning books," she said.

Sep 22, 2017 · Students

What are some of the books that have influenced your growth and development, or challenged you to think in new ways?

'Required Reading' is an open stack community curation project to feature the stories of ASU students and encourage new interactions with library collections.

Send us your top 10-20 list of meaningful books and tell us why they are significant. If your collection is selected as a winner, ASU Library will acquire all the titles you listed and showcase the collection at one of our libraries.

Please submit a written statement for your collection (250-500 words) and select one of the four categories below that best describes it:

  • Books that make you YOU at ASU
  • The Sun Devil must-read books for a better future
  • Freshman Challenge: 21 books for the Class of 2021
  • My state of mind: Arizona and the Southwest

Submit your collection online: https://goo.gl/forms/MaUOXlswexG3F2I02

Deadline to submit is November 30

All submissions must be complete to be judged. Submissions will be judged based on the quality of the statement and the collection.

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