The Library Channel: news, events, announcements

The Library Channel

Oct 01, 2019 ·

In partnership with the Rainbow Coalition, the ASU Library is proud to take part in the university-wide event Out @ ASU Week, October 7-11, in celebration and support of ASU students of all gender identities and sexual orientations.  

The week of events coincides with National Coming Out Day, which is Friday, Oct. 11. 

“Out @ ASU is a week of events designed to promote a safe and supportive campus environment through educational advocacy and a series of celebrations,” said ASU librarian Andrew Barber. “The ASU Library is proud to support Out @ ASU by showcasing our collection of resources that recognize, affirm and celebrate all gender identities and sexual orientations.” 

As part of Out @ ASU Week, the ASU Library will be screening a film, Queer Japan, at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 8, in C34 of Hayden Library. 

“We are very excited to host a screening of 'Queer Japan' with the Rainbow Coalition!” said Barber. “This documentary is receiving a lot of praise, and the ASU Library is proud to host it before it becomes widely available. We are also going to add it to our vast collection of queer cinema and literature in the near future.”  

In addition to a kick-off event scheduled for Monday, Oct. 7, on the Student Services Lawn, on the Tempe campus, there will be campus tabling throughout the week with the opportunity for students to make buttons indicating their preferred pronouns and browse LGBTQIA+ book displays.   

For more information on Out @ ASU Week, contact Andrew Barber at andrew.barber.1@asu.edu

Sep 23, 2019 ·

Please join the ASU Library for an engaging discussion with Margaret M. Bruchac, an Indigenous anthropologist and associate professor of anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, regarding her 2018 book, "Savage Kin: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists," this year’s winner of the Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award.

Now in its 11th year, the book award emphasizes indigenous research that is developed out of a meaningful relationship with the community on which it’s focused.

As chair of the book selection committee, ASU’s David Martinez, associate professor of American Indian Studies, has led the award for more than a decade’s worth of research by indigenous scholars, Native and non-Native, around issues of environmental justice, sexual violence, historical representation and tribal sovereignty.

Bruchac’s “Savage Kin” explores the contributions of Indigenous informants to the anthropological research enterprise of the 20th century, and highlights early encounters between anthropologists and Indigenous communities that served to generate foundational knowledge and collecting practices that still affect Indigenous communities today. 

Martinez will lead the discussion with Bruchac, as part of the 11th annual Labriola award event, hosted by the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, set to take place from 10:30 a.m. to noon, Sept. 25, in West Hall 135.

This event is free and open to the public. More information is here

Sep 19, 2019 ·

In 2017, the ASU Library was awarded a $450,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to apply a three-year grant project toward building and expanding community-driven collections in an effort to preserve, improve and include underrepresented voices in Arizona’s historical archives.  

The work is now being recognized nationally.

Most recently, the library’s community-driven archives team, led by ASU Archivist Nancy Godoy, was honored by the Arizona Library Association with a service award and by the Popular Culture Association as the “2019 First Runner Up for Best Electronic Research Site.”

Godoy and her team, archivists Alana Varner and Jessica Salow, say that highlighting marginalized history is a way of ensuring representation, and by teaching communities how to document their own history they are planting seeds for further growth.

“This work is not new – people have been talking about community archives for 20 years or so – but as far as the work of teaching communities how to do this work and continue it on their own, that’s fairly recent,” says Godoy, who has worked tirelessly to grow the Chicano Research Collection at Arizona State University as well as the Bj Bud Memorial Archives, which is the largest archive in Arizona documenting LGBT history.

According to a 2012 report by the Arizona Archives Matrix Project, LGBT, Asian-American, African-American and Latino communities, which make up 30 percent of Arizona’s population, are represented in less than 2 percent of known archival collections.

The community-driven archives team co-hosts free regular events in public libraries and bilingual bookstores, and is actively looking for more community partners. The events are unique in that they provide attendees with archival supplies and free archive starter kits containing bilingual preservation information. Some of the events focus on teaching attendees how to scan photos and conduct an oral history interview, and provide free scans of their material on a USB drive.

"A lot of our work is about visibility and accessibility, and there is also a real focus on community building," said Godoy. "We’re creating intergenerational and intersectional safe spaces where individuals, driven by justice and a deep love for themselves and their communities, could use archival knowledge to preserve their history and dismantle the power structure that has dehumanized them.”

Godoy and her team will be honored Friday, Nov. 8, in Tucson, by the Arizona Library Association.

Sep 06, 2019 ·

New York Times and Wall Street Journal

If you are a current student, faculty or staff member enjoying your free digital access to the New York Times, then you will be happy to know that you also have free digital access to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

All you need to do is activate your free subscriptions, a quick and simple process.

The WSJ service can be accessed via tablet, smartphone app or the web, and the service includes resources for faculty to seamlessly integrate content into course pages in facilitating classroom discussion of relevant and timely news stories. 

Student accounts will stay active until their graduation date, while faculty and staff will need to validate their memberships once a year.  

 

Stream films, documentaries for free on Kanopy

For ASU students, faculty and staff seeking thoughtful entertainment — everything from Chaplin to foreign and independent films — high quality video content is available to stream free of charge via the Kanopy platform.

An on-demand streaming service for public libraries and universities, Kanopy features a large, curated collection of diverse, unique and award-winning films and documentaries.

To start streaming, all you need to do is sign up.

 

Questions? Contact Britt Lewis at britt.lewis@asu.edu.

Aug 30, 2019 ·

There are many ways to reinvent a library. This academic year, the Arizona State University Library will introduce you to a few of them.   

Just in time for the start of the fall semester, and amidst a major renovation, Hayden Library has opened the Concourse level, the first newly designed space of the Hayden2020 reinvention project.

The Concourse connects the lower levels of ASU’s largest library to its four-story, above-ground tower, set to open its doors this January.

“The ASU community will be glad to know that the Hayden Library has grown bigger this semester, not smaller,” said Tomalee Doan, associate university librarian for Engagement and Learning Services. “With the opening of the Concourse level, and as we get closer to 2020, students can expect to see greater options for studying, learning and research support.”

Eight new classrooms have been added to Hayden Library's Concourse, along with a new library entrance on the north side of the library near the School of Life Sciences. 

In addition to the new classrooms, Hayden Library now features more meeting and study space with enhanced casual seating options to make students feel more comfortable and supported during their study sessions and group work. 

Students looking to take a break and relax now have the option to browse a variety of themed book collections scattered throughout the new space or get a bite to eat at the P.O.D market.

The Hayden Library Concourse also houses an interfaith reflection room, for prayer and meditation, a wellness room and gender-inclusive restrooms. 

“We are nearing the finish line of the transformation of Hayden Library, and the new spaces that have opened this semester are a reflection of that,” Doan said. “It’s just the beginning of what’s to come.”

No more paywall 

If you are a current student, faculty or staff member enjoying your free digital access to the New York Times, then you will be happy to know that you also have free digital access to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

All you need to do is activate the account

The WSJ service can be accessed via tablet, smartphone app or the web, and the service includes resources for faculty to seamlessly integrate content into course pages in facilitating classroom discussion of relevant and timely news stories. 

Student accounts will stay active until their graduation date, while faculty and staff will need to validate their memberships once a year.  

For ASU students, faculty and staff seeking thoughtful entertainment — everything from Chaplin to foreign and independent films — high quality video content is available to stream free of charge via the Kanopy platform.

An on-demand streaming service for public libraries and universities, Kanopy features a large, curated collection of diverse, unique and award-winning films and documentaries.

To start streaming, all you need to do is sign up.

Boost your research

Several new support offerings for researchers are available through the ASU Library this semester.

Among them is Researcher Support, offering ASU researchers guidance across the research lifecycle, from planning to data storage, in an effort to maximize the quality, productivity and accessibility of ASU research.

For ASU students looking to gain the research skills that will help them succeed in graduate school, the Graduate Scholars Toolkit is a series of one-hour workshops offered at various times throughout the semester on a variety of topics, including copyright, citation management, collaboration and data sharing tools, data visualization and text analysis.

The workshops are offered on all campuses with more online offerings to come.

For students, faculty and staff looking for research opportunities in data science, the Unit for Data Science and Analytics is launching its Open Lab for the 2019–20 academic year. 

A weekly event in Hayden Library, the Open Lab brings together researchers interested in collaborating and learning new skills with ongoing and available projects that engage machine learning, data visualization, text and data mining, network analysis and more.

In addition to Open Lab, the Unit for Data Science and Analytics is also open for collaborations with faculty and staff. 

“Our model is to do great work in interdisciplinary data science, and we want to make sure we include as many people as possible, whether faculty, student or staff,” said Michael Simeone, director of data science for the ASU Library.

The lab also directly mentors students and teams, meeting by appointment for developing their experiments and studies. All skill levels are welcome. 

Interested in data science and/or Open Lab? Reach out to the team for more information. 

Get your books delivered 

Need to pick up some books but can’t make it to the library?

Get them delivered!  

Secure, self-service book delivery lockers are now available in Armstrong Hall on the Tempe campus to allow for the quick and convenient picking up and returning of library materials. 

All you need is your Sun Card. 

Aug 28, 2019 ·

In 2013, Maricopa Community Colleges began a strategic district-wide initiative to cut down the cost of a college education for Arizona students. 

By encouraging and providing support for instructors to locate, adopt and create open and no-cost educational materials and textbooks, the Maricopa Millions Open Educational Resources Project was born, saving students more than $11 million in its first five years.  

Now a nationally renowned leader in the open education movement, the Maricopa Millions Project has partnered with Arizona State University to offer faculty and instructors the opportunity to learn from the project’s expertise.  

ASU faculty and instructors are invited to attend a seven-part workshop series called “Exploring the World of Open Education.”  

The workshops cover a variety of topics: open education, copyright and open licensing, finding and reusing open resources, creating your own open educational resources (OERs) and designing renewable assignments.  

For the second year, ASU Library’s Anali Maughan Perry, a Scholarly Communication Librarian, will lead two of the workshops in the series that focus on copyright and open licensing expertise, previously not available in the Maricopa district.  

“While librarians at universities have been developing these areas of expertise for several years, they are less common at community college libraries,” said Perry. “Having a basic understanding of copyright, fair use and Creative Commons licenses is critical to making decisions about using, modifying and creating educational resources.” 

One ASU location, SkySong, was added to the series to encourage ASU attendance, but all ASU and Maricopa instructors are welcome to attend the workshops at any location.  

Those who attend all seven workshops will receive an “OER Practitioner” certificate from the Maricopa Millions Project.  

To learn more and/or register, check out the complete workshop schedule

Aug 13, 2019 ·

Are you a student, staff or faculty member at ASU interested in collaborating on research and/or building your data research skills?

Then come join us for Open Lab, a weekly event taking place every Wednesday to get connected with ongoing and available projects that engage maching learning, data visualization, text and data mining, network analysis and more.

Whether you're a student, faculty member or researcher, all are welcome to join Open Lab, which is divided into two sessions, occurring every Wednesday beginning Sept. 11:

Data science for newcomers: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

Advanced projects and topics: 1 to 3 p.m.

Based in Hayden Library and affiliated with the Biosocial Complexity Initiative, the Unit for Data Science and Analytics provides opportunities for project-based work and learning. All disciplines and skill levels are welcome. 

The Unit for Data Science and Analytics also mentors students and teams in formulating their own experiments and studies. One of its main goals is to cohort students and set them up with project experience that they can use in their academic and professional careers.

Learn more about data science at ASU.

Aug 05, 2019 ·

Need to pick up a book but can’t make it to the library?

Get it delivered!  

Secure, self-service book delivery lockers are now available in Armstrong Hall on the Tempe campus to allow for the quick and convenient picking up and returning of library materials.  

The pick-up and return lockers in Armstrong Hall are a new service of the ASU Library.  

 

So, how do the lockers work? 

  • To request locker pick-up, select “Armstrong Hall” for your pick-up location. 
     

  • When your materials are ready for pick-up, you will receive an automated notice alerting you to the locker where your materials have been placed.  
     

  • Don’t forget your Sun Card! You’ll need it to retrieve your materials. 
      

  • Head downstairs to the lower level of Armstrong Hall to pick up your items from your assigned locker. You will need to slide your Sun Card to open the locker.  
     

  • Additionally, most library materials can be returned to the lockers. 

The lockers are only accessible during Armstrong Hall building hours.

For more information on this new service, visit the ASU Library’s FAQ page

Jun 27, 2019 ·

High school students engage in summer program of coding, 3D design

For Jesse Lopez, the opportunity to partner with Upward Bound, a federally-funded academic program for college-bound students from underfunded communities, was a chance to pay it forward, since Lopez had once participated in the program himself. 

“I came from a culturally rich but super broke L.A. community, so Upward Bound introduced me to the idea of attending college and helped me every step of the way in high school to be accepted and attend UC Santa Barbara,” said Lopez, who completed residential summer programs with Upward Bound at Harvey Mudd College and UC Davis throughout his high school years. 

Now, the director of student success for the ASU Library, Lopez is working to increase academic support services for one of Arizona State University’s fastest-growing populations: first-generation students, who make up 35% of ASU’s undergraduate and graduate student population.  

Lopez says partnering with Upward Bound is one way to support first-generation students by giving them the skills they need before they even enter their first year of college.  

“This was the ASU Library’s second summer hosting Upward Bound, and this year we offered a curriculum based in technical literacy with a focus on coding and 3D design,” said Lopez. “A lot of these students come from schools that don’t have makerspaces or technical literacy programs, and few of them know coding or have had experience on 3D printers. What better environment for them to learn these skills and how to apply them than in the library makerspace?” 

Awash with 3D prototypes, vinyl cutters, sewing kits, microcontroller kits and projects near-finished and others abandoned, the Hayden Library makerspace is truly a laboratory for learning — in all of its glorious stages.  

There is a lot of tinkering, and it can be messy.

“Messy learning is the best,” said Victor Surovec, coordinator of maker services for the ASU Library. “Our goal is to get everyone in here playing and having fun. When you make, you take in a lot of knowledge. You’re engaging with the material in a dynamic way, so you’re constantly having to adapt. The maker mindset is a good mindset for learning.” 

Each weekday morning over the summer, between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m, the makerspace comes to life with the sounds of 27 soon-to-be high school sophomores spending a good portion of their summer vacation learning how to code and create.  

During their first week of classes, the students learned how to design and build 3D paper masks.

The mask-making was led by Surovec’s fellow maker Sarah Lankenau Moench, assistant professor of costume technology in the School of Film, Dance and Theatre within ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, who regularly uses the library makerspace to engineer costumes and other stage materials, lead workshops and stay informed about the various free resources available to ASU students. 

"Learning how to create a mask means taking a 2D design and translating that into a 3D object. It's sculpture!" Lankenau Moench said. "Masks are manageable in size and can be made with a variety of materials. They can be playful, evocative and expressive. I gave the students the option of starting with mask patterns designed by a company called Wintercroft. Having a pattern meant everyone had the opportunity to go through the process of sculpting their materials."

Under her instruction, the Upward Bounders incorporated various maker technology into their masks. Some students layered on digital elements, such as lights, fans and thermostats. (“If their mask gets to a certain heat, their fan will automatically turn on,” said Surovec.) While others devoted more time to painting their mask.

"It is so inspiring to come back several weeks later and see the explosion of creativity that came out of each student reflected in their masks," Lankenau Moench said. "The maker movement has made it possible for anyone to discover their inner artisan."

At the end of the program, each student took home the mask they designed and made, along with their very own Arduino electronics starter kit — a tool that both Surovec and Lopez say they hope will get used often.

“Giving them each an Arduino kit to take home is a way of continuing to provide them the access and opportunity needed to master the skills they learned here,” Lopez said. “They can keep applying them to new projects.”

Surovec added, “Working on a project can be an incredible motivator for learning.” 

- Britt Lewis, Communications and Donor Relations

Jun 11, 2019 ·

No more paywall!

Digital subscriptions to the Wall Street Journal are now available to all current ASU students, faculty and staff.  

Once you have activated your subscription, you can access Wall Street Journal content via the web, as well as via apps for smartphones and tablets. 

Here's how to activate your free digital subscription:  

  1. Go to the WSJ registration page: https://WSJ.com/ArizonaState 
  2. Enter your first and last name 
  3. Select an Account Type from the dropdown: Student, Professor, or Staff 
  4. Enter your ASU email address and create a password. The email address and password will allow access on other devices outside of the university network. 
  5. Click Create to complete registration and create your WSJ subscription. 
  6. Once you have an account you can go directly to: https://www.wsj.com/  
     

If you are a student, your account will stay active until your graduation date. Faculty and staff will need to validate their memberships once a year from the ASU URL:  https://WSJ.com/ArizonaState 

If you already have a personal paid subscription, you can call 1-800-JOURNAL (1-800-568-7625) to switch from your paid subscription to the membership through ASU, and you will be refunded the remaining balance. 

Have questions about this new resource?  Please contact Ask a Librarian for help via live chat or email. 

Did you know? ASU faculty, students and staff also have free digital access to the New York Times.

 

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