The Library Channel: news, events, announcements

The Library Channel

Sep 06, 2019 ·

New York Times and Wall Street Journal

If you are a current student, faculty or staff member enjoying your free digital access to the New York Times, then you will be happy to know that you also have free digital access to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

All you need to do is activate your free subscriptions, a quick and simple process.

The WSJ service can be accessed via tablet, smartphone app or the web, and the service includes resources for faculty to seamlessly integrate content into course pages in facilitating classroom discussion of relevant and timely news stories. 

Student accounts will stay active until their graduation date, while faculty and staff will need to validate their memberships once a year.  

 

Stream films, documentaries for free on Kanopy

For ASU students, faculty and staff seeking thoughtful entertainment — everything from Chaplin to foreign and independent films — high quality video content is available to stream free of charge via the Kanopy platform.

An on-demand streaming service for public libraries and universities, Kanopy features a large, curated collection of diverse, unique and award-winning films and documentaries.

To start streaming, all you need to do is sign up.

 

Questions? Contact Britt Lewis at britt.lewis@asu.edu.

Aug 30, 2019 ·

There are many ways to reinvent a library. This academic year, the Arizona State University Library will introduce you to a few of them.   

Just in time for the start of the fall semester, and amidst a major renovation, Hayden Library has opened the Concourse level, the first newly designed space of the Hayden2020 reinvention project.

The Concourse connects the lower levels of ASU’s largest library to its four-story, above-ground tower, set to open its doors this January.

“The ASU community will be glad to know that the Hayden Library has grown bigger this semester, not smaller,” said Tomalee Doan, associate university librarian for Engagement and Learning Services. “With the opening of the Concourse level, and as we get closer to 2020, students can expect to see greater options for studying, learning and research support.”

Eight new classrooms have been added to Hayden Library's Concourse, along with a new library entrance on the north side of the library near the School of Life Sciences. 

In addition to the new classrooms, Hayden Library now features more meeting and study space with enhanced casual seating options to make students feel more comfortable and supported during their study sessions and group work. 

Students looking to take a break and relax now have the option to browse a variety of themed book collections scattered throughout the new space or get a bite to eat at the P.O.D market.

The Hayden Library Concourse also houses an interfaith reflection room, for prayer and meditation, a wellness room and gender-inclusive restrooms. 

“We are nearing the finish line of the transformation of Hayden Library, and the new spaces that have opened this semester are a reflection of that,” Doan said. “It’s just the beginning of what’s to come.”

No more paywall 

If you are a current student, faculty or staff member enjoying your free digital access to the New York Times, then you will be happy to know that you also have free digital access to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

All you need to do is activate the account

The WSJ service can be accessed via tablet, smartphone app or the web, and the service includes resources for faculty to seamlessly integrate content into course pages in facilitating classroom discussion of relevant and timely news stories. 

Student accounts will stay active until their graduation date, while faculty and staff will need to validate their memberships once a year.  

For ASU students, faculty and staff seeking thoughtful entertainment — everything from Chaplin to foreign and independent films — high quality video content is available to stream free of charge via the Kanopy platform.

An on-demand streaming service for public libraries and universities, Kanopy features a large, curated collection of diverse, unique and award-winning films and documentaries.

To start streaming, all you need to do is sign up.

Boost your research

Several new support offerings for researchers are available through the ASU Library this semester.

Among them is Researcher Support, offering ASU researchers guidance across the research lifecycle, from planning to data storage, in an effort to maximize the quality, productivity and accessibility of ASU research.

For ASU students looking to gain the research skills that will help them succeed in graduate school, the Graduate Scholars Toolkit is a series of one-hour workshops offered at various times throughout the semester on a variety of topics, including copyright, citation management, collaboration and data sharing tools, data visualization and text analysis.

The workshops are offered on all campuses with more online offerings to come.

For students, faculty and staff looking for research opportunities in data science, the Unit for Data Science and Analytics is launching its Open Lab for the 2019–20 academic year. 

A weekly event in Hayden Library, the Open Lab brings together researchers interested in collaborating and learning new skills with ongoing and available projects that engage machine learning, data visualization, text and data mining, network analysis and more.

In addition to Open Lab, the Unit for Data Science and Analytics is also open for collaborations with faculty and staff. 

“Our model is to do great work in interdisciplinary data science, and we want to make sure we include as many people as possible, whether faculty, student or staff,” said Michael Simeone, director of data science for the ASU Library.

The lab also directly mentors students and teams, meeting by appointment for developing their experiments and studies. All skill levels are welcome. 

Interested in data science and/or Open Lab? Reach out to the team for more information. 

Get your books delivered 

Need to pick up some books but can’t make it to the library?

Get them delivered!  

Secure, self-service book delivery lockers are now available in Armstrong Hall on the Tempe campus to allow for the quick and convenient picking up and returning of library materials. 

All you need is your Sun Card. 

Aug 28, 2019 ·

In 2013, Maricopa Community Colleges began a strategic district-wide initiative to cut down the cost of a college education for Arizona students. 

By encouraging and providing support for instructors to locate, adopt and create open and no-cost educational materials and textbooks, the Maricopa Millions Open Educational Resources Project was born, saving students more than $11 million in its first five years.  

Now a nationally renowned leader in the open education movement, the Maricopa Millions Project has partnered with Arizona State University to offer faculty and instructors the opportunity to learn from the project’s expertise.  

ASU faculty and instructors are invited to attend a seven-part workshop series called “Exploring the World of Open Education.”  

The workshops cover a variety of topics: open education, copyright and open licensing, finding and reusing open resources, creating your own open educational resources (OERs) and designing renewable assignments.  

For the second year, ASU Library’s Anali Maughan Perry, a Scholarly Communication Librarian, will lead two of the workshops in the series that focus on copyright and open licensing expertise, previously not available in the Maricopa district.  

“While librarians at universities have been developing these areas of expertise for several years, they are less common at community college libraries,” said Perry. “Having a basic understanding of copyright, fair use and Creative Commons licenses is critical to making decisions about using, modifying and creating educational resources.” 

One ASU location, SkySong, was added to the series to encourage ASU attendance, but all ASU and Maricopa instructors are welcome to attend the workshops at any location.  

Those who attend all seven workshops will receive an “OER Practitioner” certificate from the Maricopa Millions Project.  

To learn more and/or register, check out the complete workshop schedule

Aug 13, 2019 ·

Are you a student, staff or faculty member at ASU interested in collaborating on research and/or building your data research skills?

Then come join us for Open Lab, a weekly event taking place every Wednesday to get connected with ongoing and available projects that engage maching learning, data visualization, text and data mining, network analysis and more.

Whether you're a student, faculty member or researcher, all are welcome to join Open Lab, which is divided into two sessions, occurring every Wednesday beginning Sept. 11:

Data science for newcomers: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

Advanced projects and topics: 1 to 3 p.m.

Based in Hayden Library and affiliated with the Biosocial Complexity Initiative, the Unit for Data Science and Analytics provides opportunities for project-based work and learning. All disciplines and skill levels are welcome. 

The Unit for Data Science and Analytics also mentors students and teams in formulating their own experiments and studies. One of its main goals is to cohort students and set them up with project experience that they can use in their academic and professional careers.

Learn more about data science at ASU.

Aug 05, 2019 ·

Need to pick up a book but can’t make it to the library?

Get it delivered!  

Secure, self-service book delivery lockers are now available in Armstrong Hall on the Tempe campus to allow for the quick and convenient picking up and returning of library materials.  

The pick-up and return lockers in Armstrong Hall are a new service of the ASU Library.  

 

So, how do the lockers work? 

  • To request locker pick-up, select “Armstrong Hall” for your pick-up location. 
     

  • When your materials are ready for pick-up, you will receive an automated notice alerting you to the locker where your materials have been placed.  
     

  • Don’t forget your Sun Card! You’ll need it to retrieve your materials. 
      

  • Head downstairs to the lower level of Armstrong Hall to pick up your items from your assigned locker. You will need to slide your Sun Card to open the locker.  
     

  • Additionally, most library materials can be returned to the lockers. 

The lockers are only accessible during Armstrong Hall building hours.

For more information on this new service, visit the ASU Library’s FAQ page

Jun 27, 2019 ·

High school students engage in summer program of coding, 3D design

For Jesse Lopez, the opportunity to partner with Upward Bound, a federally-funded academic program for college-bound students from underfunded communities, was a chance to pay it forward, since Lopez had once participated in the program himself. 

“I came from a culturally rich but super broke L.A. community, so Upward Bound introduced me to the idea of attending college and helped me every step of the way in high school to be accepted and attend UC Santa Barbara,” said Lopez, who completed residential summer programs with Upward Bound at Harvey Mudd College and UC Davis throughout his high school years. 

Now, the director of student success for the ASU Library, Lopez is working to increase academic support services for one of Arizona State University’s fastest-growing populations: first-generation students, who make up 35% of ASU’s undergraduate and graduate student population.  

Lopez says partnering with Upward Bound is one way to support first-generation students by giving them the skills they need before they even enter their first year of college.  

“This was the ASU Library’s second summer hosting Upward Bound, and this year we offered a curriculum based in technical literacy with a focus on coding and 3D design,” said Lopez. “A lot of these students come from schools that don’t have makerspaces or technical literacy programs, and few of them know coding or have had experience on 3D printers. What better environment for them to learn these skills and how to apply them than in the library makerspace?” 

Awash with 3D prototypes, vinyl cutters, sewing kits, microcontroller kits and projects near-finished and others abandoned, the Hayden Library makerspace is truly a laboratory for learning — in all of its glorious stages.  

There is a lot of tinkering, and it can be messy.

“Messy learning is the best,” said Victor Surovec, coordinator of maker services for the ASU Library. “Our goal is to get everyone in here playing and having fun. When you make, you take in a lot of knowledge. You’re engaging with the material in a dynamic way, so you’re constantly having to adapt. The maker mindset is a good mindset for learning.” 

Each weekday morning over the summer, between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m, the makerspace comes to life with the sounds of 27 soon-to-be high school sophomores spending a good portion of their summer vacation learning how to code and create.  

During their first week of classes, the students learned how to design and build 3D paper masks.

The mask-making was led by Surovec’s fellow maker Sarah Lankenau Moench, assistant professor of costume technology in the School of Film, Dance and Theatre within ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, who regularly uses the library makerspace to engineer costumes and other stage materials, lead workshops and stay informed about the various free resources available to ASU students. 

"Learning how to create a mask means taking a 2D design and translating that into a 3D object. It's sculpture!" Lankenau Moench said. "Masks are manageable in size and can be made with a variety of materials. They can be playful, evocative and expressive. I gave the students the option of starting with mask patterns designed by a company called Wintercroft. Having a pattern meant everyone had the opportunity to go through the process of sculpting their materials."

Under her instruction, the Upward Bounders incorporated various maker technology into their masks. Some students layered on digital elements, such as lights, fans and thermostats. (“If their mask gets to a certain heat, their fan will automatically turn on,” said Surovec.) While others devoted more time to painting their mask.

"It is so inspiring to come back several weeks later and see the explosion of creativity that came out of each student reflected in their masks," Lankenau Moench said. "The maker movement has made it possible for anyone to discover their inner artisan."

At the end of the program, each student took home the mask they designed and made, along with their very own Arduino electronics starter kit — a tool that both Surovec and Lopez say they hope will get used often.

“Giving them each an Arduino kit to take home is a way of continuing to provide them the access and opportunity needed to master the skills they learned here,” Lopez said. “They can keep applying them to new projects.”

Surovec added, “Working on a project can be an incredible motivator for learning.” 

- Britt Lewis, Communications and Donor Relations

Jun 11, 2019 ·

No more paywall!

Digital subscriptions to the Wall Street Journal are now available to all current ASU students, faculty and staff.  

Once you have activated your subscription, you can access Wall Street Journal content via the web, as well as via apps for smartphones and tablets. 

Here's how to activate your free digital subscription:  

  1. Go to the WSJ registration page: https://WSJ.com/ArizonaState 
  2. Enter your first and last name 
  3. Select an Account Type from the dropdown: Student, Professor, or Staff 
  4. Enter your ASU email address and create a password. The email address and password will allow access on other devices outside of the university network. 
  5. Click Create to complete registration and create your WSJ subscription. 
  6. Once you have an account you can go directly to: https://www.wsj.com/  
     

If you are a student, your account will stay active until your graduation date. Faculty and staff will need to validate their memberships once a year from the ASU URL:  https://WSJ.com/ArizonaState 

If you already have a personal paid subscription, you can call 1-800-JOURNAL (1-800-568-7625) to switch from your paid subscription to the membership through ASU, and you will be refunded the remaining balance. 

Have questions about this new resource?  Please contact Ask a Librarian for help via live chat or email. 

Did you know? ASU faculty, students and staff also have free digital access to the New York Times.

 

May 31, 2019 ·

Michelle Miranda-Thorstad doesn’t remember exactly how she discovered Drag Queen Story Hour, but she recalls having an immediate interest in it.

At the time, she worked for the Maricopa County Library District, where together with Christopher Jay Hall, or Miss Nature, she facilitated her very first edition of the Drag Queen Story Hour in a privately rented room in the library. 

“We did a small story hour and got just two families there,” said Miranda-Thorstad. “One of our little guests came in full costume, walked in and said, ‘I’m a princess.’ The amount of confidence was just so great for such a little person.” 

Miranda-Thorstad is a Senior Library Specialist with the ASU Library who spends much of her time outside of her full-time job working to support and advance LGBTQ+ families in the Phoenix area.

Originally launched in San Francisco in 2015 by Michelle Tea of Radar Productions, Drag Queen Story Hour is now an official nonprofit organization inspiring and supporting more inclusive children’s story hours around the country – all led by drag queens and kings. 

Despite Miranda-Thorstad’s early interest in the story hour, she wouldn't begin regularly hosting one for another two years, after joining forces with David Boyles, an Instructor in the ASU English Department, who specializes in popular culture, digital literacy and visual rhetoric.

She met Boyles at a training offered through the GLSEN Network, a nonprofit organization that works with schools to make them safer places for students in the LGBTQ+ community, and the two began working together. 

In February 2019, Drag Story Hour - Arizona was born. (Check out their Facebook page.)  

“Working with Michelle on Drag Story Hour - Arizona has been an incredibly rewarding experience,” said Boyles. “The community has given us a great response and it's shown the need for this type of event. We need more events and programming that are aimed at our LGBTQ+ youth and families, and make them feel seen and included.”

Their first story hour event was held at the Downtown Chandler Public Library, where Boyles visited frequently as a child.

“Doing our first event at the Downtown Chandler Public Library was very emotional for me because that is the library I grew up going to and it meant a lot to me to be able to bring this event to that space,” he said. “And it was made even more special because my friends from the Arizona Clinic Defense Force showed up to make sure our guests were safe.”

Since February, Boyles and Miranda-Thorstad have hosted four story hours. Board members of Drag Story Hour Arizona are Edie Lopez, Lenore Filipczuk and Christopher Jay Hall.

“About 57 people attended the first event. I was just amazed,” said Miranda-Thorstad.

Drag Queen Story Hour aims to capture “the imagination and play of the gender fluidity of childhood, and gives kids glamorous, positive and unabashedly queer role models.” 

“The story hour is all about inclusion,” says Miranda-Thorstad. “It’s about creating a safe space for same-sex families. We try to be as gender non-conforming as possible. Phoenix needs programs like this. It’s my hope that the story hours will one day live at public libraries.” 

The next event for Drag Story Hour is Sunday, June 2, as part of a fundraiser by Haircuts for Humans at Public Image to benefit the Arizona Trans Youth and Parent Organization. 

Looking for some inclusive books for children? Here are a few that Michelle Miranda-Thorstad recommends:  

And Tango Makes Three

The Boy Who Cried Fabulous

Sparkle Boy

Worm Loves Worm

Donovan’s Big Day 

A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo

May 02, 2019 ·

Following the direction of the Society of American Archivists and other leading organizations, the Arizona State University (ASU) Library is pleased to announce its endorsement and adoption of the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials.  

A collaborative effort between archives professionals and Native American community stakeholders in North America, the Protocols were developed as part of an effort to promote best practices in the preservation and use of Native American archival materials held by non-tribal organizations. The Protocols address ten issues, including the importance of consultation with Native Nations in policy decisions regarding Native Nations cultural materials, understanding Native American values and perspectives, rethinking public accessibility and use of some materials, and providing culturally responsive context for archival collections.  

In 2018, the Society of American Archivists endorsed the Protocols as an external standard, an act that signaled to the archives profession that the Protocols should be used by institutions following SAA standards.  

“On behalf of the ASU Library and the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, I am pleased to formally acknowledge the Library’s adherence to the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials. ASU is proud to recognize and honor these Protocols,” said Joyce Martin, Curator for the Labriola Center at the ASU Library. “With this endorsement the ASU Library aims to adopt these best practices in the care and use of Native American archival materials.” 

The endorsement of these Protocols by the ASU Library will help to further ensure appropriate processes and direction for the acquisition and management of materials relating to Native Nations. This means that the ASU Library will collaborate with relevant Native American communities when appropriate, will copy and share materials with Indigenous Nations upon request, and will promote reciprocal training, among other practices outlined in the Protocols. 

In alignment with the ASU Charter, the Protocols represent a further step forward for ASU in taking greater responsibility for the communities it serves in Arizona and beyond. 

Apr 26, 2019 ·

 

Your paper is due at midnight. Your roommate just got dumped and needs to talk it out. And the status of your group project is a mystery to all.

Don’t worry. You’ve got this.  

 

 

 

Here are 5 reasons why:

  1. ASU librarians. Helping you succeed is not just a thing they’re good at – it’s in their job description. Let them help you. They want to help you. It’s why they’re here.
  1. Online help.  Your questions about citations, keywords and research databases already have answers, and you can find them on our FAQs page, where librarians are also available for online chat. Relax – if you have a connection to the internet, there is hope.
  1. Group study rooms. Maybe it’s time to figure out what’s going on with your group project. Several types of group study spaces are available at our libraries to support those necessary conversations and collaborations. Gather your group and get it done.
  1. Quiet and silent study. No signs of your roommate quieting down any time soon. Have no fear – ASU Library quiet and silent study is a thing, and it’s here for you. It’s a magical place where devices go silent and your thoughts thank you.
  1. Counseling. Not a library service, but a great resource nonetheless, offered to ASU students who may be feeling like they need to talk to someone. You’re not alone. Also, you may want to suggest it to your roommate.

Relax, take a breath. You’ve got this.

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