libchanheaderlogo.png

The Library Channel

Dec 06, 2017 ·

As materials move out of Hayden Library, in preparation for the library’s renovation, the Labriola Center will be moving to a new, temporary location during Hayden’s remodel, to be complete in 2020.

Beginning January 8, the Labriola Center will welcome students, faculty, staff, researchers and the public to its new location in room 305 of Fletcher Library on ASU’s West campus.

Open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Labriola will continue to provide its same high level of service to the ASU community and beyond – offering access to its unique collections, specialized reference assistance, library skills instruction for classes and co-sponsorship of various public events.

While we understand the inconvenience this may cause, we are excited about the future of ASU Library and Labriola’s place in it.

ASU Library has entered a lively phase of its reinvention, with many books, collections and materials in transit as Hayden Library prepares to undergo a major renovation, slated for 2018-2020.

While all libraries will be impacted, students, faculty and staff can expect to see the most disruptions at Hayden Library and Noble Library on the Tempe campus.

Plans to redesign Hayden Library include adding multiple points of access, with greater indoor-outdoor connection; dedicating space for community gatherings; breaking the library up thematically to better facilitate navigation and research discovery; featuring and enhancing special collections; and building a smaller, highly curated academic print collection that draws from the library's 4.5 million volumes.

Questions about the Labriola move? Contact Joyce Martin at joyce.martin@asu.edu or 480-965-6490.

Dec 06, 2017 ·

As of December 9, the Luhrs Reading Room will be closed through January 7, in preparation for the Hayden Library renovation

Reference services for University Archives and Distinctive Collections will also be suspended during this time.

Access to materials belonging to the Child Drama Collection, Greater Arizona Collection, Chicano/a Research Collection and Special Collections will resume January 8.

Questions about reference services may be directed to archives@asu.edu or (480) 965-4932.

ASU Library has entered a lively phase of its reinvention, with many books, collections and materials in transit as Hayden Library prepares to undergo a major renovation, slated for 2018-2020.

While all libraries will be impacted, students, faculty and staff can expect to see the most disruptions at Hayden Library and Noble Library on the Tempe campus.

Plans to redesign Hayden Library include adding multiple points of access, with greater indoor-outdoor connection; dedicating space for community gatherings; breaking the library up thematically to better facilitate navigation and research discovery; featuring and enhancing special collections; and building a smaller, highly curated academic print collection that draws from the library's 4.5 million volumes.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Dec 01, 2017 ·

Pest control has treated an isolated area of Noble Library for bed bugs, and ASU Library facility managers are doing everything they can to ensure the area is contained and the library is free of pests.

No further reports of pests have been issued.

If you see evidence of pests or hear something from someone who has, please don't hesitate to notify the library's front desk staff so we can take care of the problem. 

 

Dec 01, 2017 ·

When the Daniel E. Noble Science and Engineering Library officially opened its doors on August 22, 1983, it became a kind of second home for Linda Shackle, who worked as a Science and Engineering Librarian for 35 years at Arizona State University.

Shackle was known for her enthusiasm, curiosity, thoroughness, insight and her desire to teach and be of service to others.

“Linda's passion and enthusiasm for science librarianship were contagious,” wrote Katherine O’Clair, an Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Librarian at California Polytechnic State University, who worked with Shackle during her career at ASU.

Shackle died on November 18, 2017, after a long illness with pancreatic cancer. She was 65.

Considered by some as “the soul of Noble Library,” Shackle took great joy in learning, serving students and faculty, and helping her colleagues, many of whom knew her as a valued mentor and colleague, always willing to offer advice and answer questions.

“I remember Linda’s warm laugh, long insightful emails, deep knowledge, generosity and kindness,” wrote ASU Librarian René Tanner. “She offered her expertise when any of us needed it. She reviewed CVs, cover letters, and shared her annual reviews and other professional materials with anyone who asked. She would spend as much time with you as you needed and mentored many of us through the continuing appointment process. She sincerely wanted us to be successful.”

Shackle's devotion to academic librarianship was evident throughout her career, particularly when a need emerged at ASU for an Engineering Librarian and Shackle took it upon herself to learn the field and curriculum so as to fill in the gaps in supporting a growing number of students majoring in the field.

She went on to become one of the first Engineering Librarians at ASU and arguably one of the most successful.

“She was an inspiring ambassador for ASU, academic librarianship, continuous learning across any and all disciplines,” wrote retired ASU Librarian Sheila Hofstetter. “Her interests and knowledge base were profound. She was delighted to learn something new and loved the ‘hunt.’”

In addition to her vast knowledge, Shackle will be remembered for her kindness and generosity, which was displayed daily through her interactions with students, faculty and fellow colleagues.

“She was generous and kind. She was brilliant,” wrote ASU Learning Services Manager Christina Peck. “She was devoted to the students and loved her job getting to help them every day and took that responsibility seriously."

For many who knew her well, she was synonymous with Noble Library and its strong sense of collegiality among librarians who worked there.

"She was infinitely patient when explaining anything, as well as infinitely charitable with her time," said retired ASU Librarian Julie Tharp. "The most valuable thing she taught me, just through example, was her unflusterability. She didn't panic or overreact, but took things in stride and figured out how to make them work."

Shackle is survived by her husband, Ron, of 35 years.

Nov 28, 2017 ·

Back by popular demand, ASU Library’s recall service has returned, giving ASU students, faculty and staff the option to request an item that is checked-out by another user.

When an item appears as “on loan,” library users may now recall that item – a process by which the loan period for a checked-out item is shortened when a request for that item is made by another user. Once the item has been recalled and returned, the item is reserved for the user who recalled it.

Starting this week, the request option “Request ASU Copy” will appear on the One Search page to reflect this service update.

Alternatively, users still have the option to request checked out items from an external library through ASU Library’s Interlibrary Loan service. This short-loan option often provides a quicker delivery time to the user making the request.  Look for the link labelled “Request External Copy.”

Need help locating or requesting materials?

  • Ask a Librarian can help get you the materials you need.
     
  • Library staff at the information desk can give you information about your requested items.
     
  • ASU librarians are happy to work with you to find the resources you need.

 

Nov 22, 2017 ·

 

Your paper is due at midnight. Your roommate just got dumped and needs to talk it out. And the status of your group project is a mystery to all.

Don’t worry. You’ve got this.  

 

 

 

Here are 7 reasons why:

  1. ASU librarians. Helping you succeed is not just a thing they’re good at – it’s in their job description. Let them help you. They want to help you. It’s why they’re here.
  1. Online help.  Your questions about citations, keywords and research databases already have answers, and you can find them on our FAQs page, where librarians are also available for online chat. Relax – if you have a connection to the internet, there is hope.
  1. Group study rooms. Maybe it’s time to figure out what’s going on with your group project. Several types of group study spaces are available at our libraries to support those necessary conversations and collaborations. Gather your group and get it done.
  1. Quiet and silent study. No signs of your roommate quieting down any time soon. Have no fear – ASU Library quiet and silent study is a thing, and it’s here for you. It’s a magical place where devices go silent and your thoughts thank you.
  1. Counseling. Not a library service, but a great resource nonetheless, offered to ASU students who may be feeling like they need to talk to someone. You’re not alone. Also, you may want to suggest it to your roommate.
  1. Stress relief stations. Starting Nov. 29, ASU Library will be offering free food and stress reduction in the form of puzzles, coloring books, stress balls and onsite librarian help. It’s a stress-free zone, we promise.  
  1. Reflection Room. Hayden Library is home to the Reflection Room, a small, quiet space where one can leave the frenzy of college life behind and unplug, meditate, pray or simply just be. Sometimes you just need a moment to reboot.

Relax, take a breath.

You’ve got this.

Nov 22, 2017 ·

Between writing papers, studying for exams and putting the final touches on a big project, ASU students might be needing a little extra support during these last two weeks of the fall semester.

Here to help, ASU Library is offering Finals Stress Relief on Wednesday, Nov. 29 all the way through Tuesday, Dec. 5.

Located in several library locations, including Hayden Library, Noble Library and Fletcher Library, stress relief stations will offer a variety of stress-reducing aids in the form of free food and drink, coloring books, stress balls, puzzles and an onsite librarian to help answer any questions.

Project Manager Patty Odle says final exams can be a particularly challenging time for ASU students, which is why, this year, she is leading stress relief activities over several consecutive days. 

“We want students to know that we are here to help them succeed, and this is just one small way to help them achieve their goals,” Odle says.

For students looking to decompress, find a moment of peace or just get some extra support, check out these ASU Library resources

Oct 31, 2017 ·

ASU Library has entered a lively phase of its reinvention, with many books, collections and materials in transit as Hayden Library prepares to undergo a major renovation, slated for 2018-2020.

While all libraries will be impacted, students, faculty and staff can expect to see the most disruptions at Hayden Library and Noble Library on the Tempe campus.

Science books identified as low-use are leaving Noble Library, while other highly used science books will remain at Noble in their new location on the second floor in the eastern-most section of compact shelving.

All science books that are leaving Noble Library, to make space for new materials coming from Hayden, will be accessible from ASU Library's high density collection (HDC). A significant portion of these materials will be available immediately for request.

Items that may appear as "unavailable" via our online library One Search can still be requested through our Interlibrary Loan service.

For help locating or requesting materials:

  • Ask A Librarian can help get you the materials you need. 
     
  • Library staff at the reference desk can give you information about your requested items. 
     
  • ASU librarians are happy to work with you to find the resources you need. 

Plans to redesign Hayden Library include adding multiple points of access, with greater indoor-outdoor connection; dedicating space for community gatherings; breaking the library up thematically to better facilitate navigation and research discovery; featuring and enhancing special collections; and building a smaller, highly curated academic print collection that draws from the library's 4.5 million volumes.

Oct 20, 2017 ·

Beginning this month, ASU Library will be entering a lively phase of its reinvention, with many books, collections and materials in transit as Hayden Library prepares to undergo a major renovation, slated for 2018-2020.

While all libraries will be impacted, students, faculty and staff can expect to see the most disruptions at Hayden Library and Noble Library on the Tempe campus. 

A significant portion of books and other materials moving out of Hayden Library will be available immediately at Noble Library.

Items that may appear as "unavailable" via our online library One Search can still be requested through our Interlibrary Loan service.

For help locating or requesting materials:

  • Ask A Librarian can help get you the materials you need. 
     
  • Library staff at the reference desk can give you information about your requested items. 
     
  • ASU librarians are happy to work with you to find the resources you need. 

Plans to redesign Hayden Library include adding multiple points of access, with greater indoor-outdoor connection; dedicating space for community gatherings; breaking the library up thematically to better facilitate navigation and research discovery; featuring and enhancing special collections; and building a smaller, highly curated academic print collection that draws from the library's 4.5 million volumes.

Oct 19, 2017 ·

"What books? Where?"

The future of the printed book is the subject of a newly released white paper by ASU Library. 

As part of a $50,000 planning grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation exploring the future of print, the analysis is aimed at fostering engagement with print resources among library users, particularly with open stack print collections and users within the local community. 

"We advocate moving toward a more flexible, more user-focused service that makes library collections easier to understand and to use," write the authors. 

The Future of the Academic Library Print Collection: A Space for Engagement explores a three-tiered system of potential approaches and actions for academic libraries to foster engagement with their collections, and includes materials and tools to help guide individual libraries towards a data-driven approach to print curation that may be tailored to their local context.

"Our print collections have a long and glorious future ahead," write the authors. "We must work to create and curate open collections that make it easier for rising student generations, to become skilled and resourceful users of print."

To learn more about ASU Library's Future of Print initiative, visit lib.asu.edu/futureprint.

Pages