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October 2017

Library Channel
Oct. 31, 2017 

 

ASU Library has entered a lively phase of its reinvention, with many books, collections and materials in transit as Hayden Library prepares to undergo a major renovation, slated for 2018-2020.

While all libraries will be impacted, students, faculty and staff can expect to see the most disruptions at Hayden Library and Noble Library on the Tempe campus.

Science books identified as low-use are leaving Noble Library, while other highly used science books will remain at Noble in their new location on the second floor in the eastern-most section of compact shelving.

All science books that are leaving Noble Library, to make space for new materials coming from Hayden, will be accessible from ASU Library's high density collection (HDC). A significant portion of these materials will be available immediately for request.

Items that may appear as "unavailable" via our online library One Search can still be requested through our Interlibrary Loan service.

For help locating or requesting materials:

  • Ask A Librarian can help get you the materials you need. 
     
  • Library staff at the reference desk can give you information about your requested items. 
     
  • ASU librarians are happy to work with you to find the resources you need. 

Plans to redesign Hayden Library include adding multiple points of access, with greater indoor-outdoor connection; dedicating space for community gatherings; breaking the library up thematically to better facilitate navigation and research discovery; featuring and enhancing special collections; and building a smaller, highly curated academic print collection that draws from the library's 4.5 million volumes.


Library Channel
Oct. 20, 2017

Beginning this month, ASU Library will be entering a lively phase of its reinvention, with many books, collections and materials in transit as Hayden Library prepares to undergo a major renovation, slated for 2018-2020.

While all libraries will be impacted, students, faculty and staff can expect to see the most disruptions at Hayden Library and Noble Library on the Tempe campus. 

A significant portion of books and other materials moving out of Hayden Library will be available immediately at Noble Library.

Items that may appear as "unavailable" via our online library One Search can still be requested through our Interlibrary Loan service.

For help locating or requesting materials:

  • Ask A Librarian can help get you the materials you need. 
     
  • Library staff at the reference desk can give you information about your requested items. 
     
  • ASU librarians are happy to work with you to find the resources you need. 

Plans to redesign Hayden Library include adding multiple points of access, with greater indoor-outdoor connection; dedicating space for community gatherings; breaking the library up thematically to better facilitate navigation and research discovery; featuring and enhancing special collections; and building a smaller, highly curated academic print collection that draws from the library's 4.5 million volumes.


Library Channel
Oct. 19, 2017

The future of the printed book is the subject of a newly released white paper by ASU Library. 

As part of a $50,000 planning grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation exploring the future of print, the analysis is aimed at fostering engagement with print resources among library users, particularly with open stack print collections and users within the local community. 

"We advocate moving toward a more flexible, more user-focused service that makes library collections easier to understand and to use," write the authors. 

The Future of the Academic Library Print Collection: A Space for Engagement explores a three-tiered system of potential approaches and actions for academic libraries to foster engagement with their collections, and includes materials and tools to help guide individual libraries towards a data-driven approach to print curation that may be tailored to their local context.

"Our print collections have a long and glorious future ahead," write the authors. "We must work to create and curate open collections that make it easier for rising student generations, to become skilled and resourceful users of print."

To learn more about ASU Library's Future of Print initiative, visit lib.asu.edu/futureprint.

The ASU Library acknowledges the twenty-two Native Nations that have inhabited this land for centuries. Arizona State University's four campuses are located in the Salt River Valley on ancestral territories of Indigenous peoples, including the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee Posh (Maricopa) Indian Communities, whose care and keeping of these lands allows us to be here today. ASU Library acknowledges the sovereignty of these nations and seeks to foster an environment of success and possibility for Native American students and patrons. We are advocates for the incorporation of Indigenous knowledge systems and research methodologies within contemporary library practice. ASU Library welcomes members of the Akimel O’odham and Pee Posh, and all Native nations to the Library.